An investigation into social issues which may impact how girls develop socially and emotionally between the ages of seven and eleven years

Nicora, Elaine Louise (2011) An investigation into social issues which may impact how girls develop socially and emotionally between the ages of seven and eleven years. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The behaviours and ways in which young girls choose to express themselves are becoming more under scrutiny in today’s culture, from the clothes they wear to the music and television they watch and listen to. Yet these actions may be a product of the messages society sends to young girls. Identity, gender and sexuality are three aspects which help young girls develop a view of how they fit within society; These can be influenced by parenting, peer groups, media, educational settings, technology and cultural beliefs. This dissertation investigates how these social factors can impact young girl’s attitudes regarding expectations in society and how they view themselves. The evidence used in throughout has been collated through secondary research from books, journals and government publications. From looking at research carried out by others, it has shown how the various influences listed helps young girls to create several identities and behaviours they adopt when in different social groups. These identities can be continuously evolving due to ‘trends’ in which certain interests, behaviours and fashions and may be seen as more popular for temporary periods of time. This results in young girls constantly adapting and internalising social queues which then become apparent through a child’s actions regarding identity, gender and sexuality.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Education and Childhood Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 29 Nov 2012 12:34
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9804

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