To what extent do sex differences in terms of neurocognition and language recall affect the performance of each sex in terms of episodic memory tasks.

Nixon, Georgia (2012) To what extent do sex differences in terms of neurocognition and language recall affect the performance of each sex in terms of episodic memory tasks. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The question of whether women outperform men at memory tasks is a controversial topic. In almost every study women have been found to excel at word recall in almost every circumstance. The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether a study on gender and language recall supported or contradicted common claims that the female gender outperforms males in this area. The study combined two experiments, one which differed in length and one which aimed to be gender-biased. The aim of this was to determine the affects of experiments that gradually became more difficult, and the affects of experiments that were specifically aimed at each gender.
    This study focused on the neurocognition of words and how biological differences between genders affect the performance of a participant in terms of memory tasks. The motivation behind this study was to explore the human brain and combine both neurolinguistics and sociolinguistics in order to research whether biological gender differences have a profound effect on performance in terms of language research.
    The techniques employed in the following study, were the gathering and recording of forty participants attempting six different recall tasks. The data has then been analysed in terms of statistical significance, producing the conclusion that females are indeed, slightly more efficient at language recall tasks, although only marginally. The objectives for the study were to add weight to the current literature suggesting a female advantage in terms of episodic memory and this has been achieved to an extent. Although there are still further conclusions to be drawn in this area, and given the opportunity this experiment would warrant being replicated on a much larger scale.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2012 11:07
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9715

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