A critical analysis of punitive redress in response to the risks posed by the nature, cause and behaviour of workplace violence within the Primary Care sector of the National Health Service”.

Rogers, Tracey (2012) A critical analysis of punitive redress in response to the risks posed by the nature, cause and behaviour of workplace violence within the Primary Care sector of the National Health Service”. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study focused on the services within the primary care sector, particularly community hospitals. In the National Health Service (NHS) the impact of workplace violence is often portrayed as a growing phenomenon. The NHS is not alone in experiencing workplace violence as demonstrated by the global studies undertaken by many healthcare organisations (Hegney, Eley, Plank, Buikstra & Parker, 2006, pp. 220-231).

    The UK government’s implementation of the ‘zero tolerance’ campaign in the late 1990s was closely followed by the creation of the Counter Fraud and Security Management Service (CFSMS, 2003) renamed, NHS Protect in April 2010. These government initiatives both advocate forms of legislative redress when tackling incidents of workplace violence. However, there are very few studies which address the magnitude and severity of incidents against a perpetrator(s) intent and profile.

    This study examined academic research and the operational perspective by comparing NHS Protect’s core data against empirical research with Local Security Management Specialists and frontline NHS staff. The research concluded that NHS Protect currently fails to identify all of the workplace violence epidemiological characteristics within primary care. There are recognised vulnerabilities but “clinical condition” (definition glossary, p.10) neurological impairment accounted for the majority of incidents within this sector.

    NHS Protect’s data presents a distorted picture of the risks facing primary care staff from workplace violence. This study has identified that further research around situational prevention and empathetic training are required within this sector rather than the application of legislative redress and sanctions.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2012 16:03
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9713

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