Justifying the Bill: an examination of neighbourhood policing and whether it is valid and sustainable under current police reform

Edwards, Maxine Lyn (2012) Justifying the Bill: an examination of neighbourhood policing and whether it is valid and sustainable under current police reform. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The future of our police service has once more moved to the centre of political debate. In July 2010, the Home Office published: ‘Policing in the 21st Century: Reconnecting Police and the People’, the Home Secretary stated in her introduction that it heralded “the most radical change to policing in 50 years.” Furthermore, in October 2010, the Comprehensive Spending Review, under the Coalition Government, outlined a 20 per cent cut to police funding by 2014/15. This will undoubtedly have an effect not only on the delivery of Neighbourhood Policing and the often much maligned Police Community Support Officer, but also in terms of the strategy the Government seeks to implement for society as a whole. This decade presents a set of challenges to the police service, which will be onerous and contentious. The term ‘public value’ has become increasingly used in decisions to be taken over what kind of police service we really want.

    This dissertation will evaluate by established academic research and debate and semi structured interviews, whether Neighbourhood Policing has been successful in implementing its objectives, and by providing reassurance, has it achieved the ultimate aim to improve public confidence in the police service. It will be argued that when organisations gain the public’s trust and confidence, the public give credence to, and accept decisions made by that organisation. It is critical for public confidence and crime reduction that an appropriately visible and available police presence is maintained. Research shows that Neighbourhood Policing is achieving its aims and by effective internal management, its implementation may be sustained under current proposed reform.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2012 16:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9707

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