High security hospital sickness absence is it a culture: an examination of the facets within the forensic mental health environment that induce sickness absence, are these factors captured accurately?

Roberts, Kevin John (2012) High security hospital sickness absence is it a culture: an examination of the facets within the forensic mental health environment that induce sickness absence, are these factors captured accurately? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The measuring of sickness absence with the NHS has only been recorded since 2000 using a standard IT system. When sickness absence was recorded before 2000, it was of limited value and did not illustrate any specific evidence on actual levels of sickness absence or the financial costs. More importantly the records did not reveal any information to the causes of these absences (Verow and Hargreaves 2000, p.251).

    High security hospitals are situated within the NHS and since 2007 have been recording sickness absence data using the ESR system. This system was designed not only to capture sickness data locally but also collate sickness absence centrally within the NHS. Since the conception of ESR the three high secure hospitals: Ashworth Hospital Mersey care; Rampton hospital Nottingham care and Broadmoor Hospital WLMHT have consistently demonstrated an above average NHS sickness absence rate (Verow and Hargreaves 2000, p.257).

    The NHS created a general categorisation for the causes of sickness absence for staff, which focused on physical, psychological or mental headings. Though this generality is designed to give an overall illustration of sickness absences for the NHS hospitals, the generalisation disguises individuals specific work related reasons for such absences. Therefore the aim of this research is to explore if there is a link between sickness absence and those staff who experience workplace violence. Furthermore to establish whether HDU staff are more at risk in their working environment than those staff who work in ARU, PDU and DSPDU.

    The conclusion from this research is that though the reporting of sickness absences has improved. There is still contradiction between the formal recordings of such information and the experiences of the nursing staff; therefore this research identifies the cause of sickness absence that the formal process misses.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2012 16:40
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9705

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