‘Dialogue Policing’, is it the answer to the effective policing of public demonstrations and protest.

miller, Ian Robert (2012) ‘Dialogue Policing’, is it the answer to the effective policing of public demonstrations and protest. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    After a relative quiet period in public order terms, Britain has witnessed a time of increasing protest activity. During the years between 2009 and 2011 there have been public protests in connection with the G20 summit, climate change and university tuition fees. Almost all of these events have been followed by criticism of the police tactics and a failure on behalf of the police to communicate effectively with protesters.

    This study offers an exploratory investigation of dialogue policing and enhanced communication between police and protesters within the context of public order events.

    The research has utilised a systematic review of the current relevant literature to examine the key principals that underpin the concept of policing within Britain. It has also considered the historical back ground to protest in Britain and how the actions of both the police and the protesters have evolved with time. This dissertation has considered the development of dialogue policing and how the deployment of officers specifically tasked with developing improved communication between the police and protesters might reduce the likelihood of future instances of violence and conflict.

    The conclusions of this study revealed that the prospects for safety and order are enhanced when the police and protesters are engaged in close working practices, which increase trust and enhance communication.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2012 16:21
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9702

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