How has the recent development of the European Union's Internal Security Strategy aided Britain's efforts to combat international security networks and reinforce border security?

Bishop, Charlotte (2012) How has the recent development of the European Union's Internal Security Strategy aided Britain's efforts to combat international security networks and reinforce border security? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation examines how the European Union’s recent development of the Internal Security Strategy (ISS) has aided Britain’s efforts to combat international criminal networks and reinforce border security. Security is a key issue for Europeans and the ISS seeks to make Europe more secure. To date, the ISS has received relatively little attention from practitioners or academics and therefore is considered worthy of research.

    A literature review was undertaken to examine Britain’s role in Europe and its relationship with the European Union (EU) regarding crime and justice policies and the historical context for the development of the ISS. The review explored challenges posed by organised crime and examined significant threats to UK borders. The parts of the ISS seeking to disrupt international criminal networks and strengthen border security were analysed with reference to these findings to assess the extent to which the ISS has aided Britain’s efforts to disrupt international criminal networks and its impact on border security.

    Organised crime is a term often used but rarely understood. The nature and challenges of organised crime, combined with the complexities of EU governance hinders law enforcement efforts seeking to combat organised crime and enhance border security. Governments and agencies responsible for tackling these issues have competing priorities and limited resources. Subsequently, decision-makers are influenced by different factors and the effectiveness of the ISS to assist Britain in these areas is largely dependent on Britain’s willingness and ability to implement the ISS, balanced against where its priorities lie in terms of security, commercial investment, citizen’s rights and sovereignty.

    It is too early to assess the full impact of the ISS and further research is required. Additionally, space available has not allowed for a full assessment of all elements of the strategy and this would prove beneficial in the future.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2012 16:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:11
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9699

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