The evolution of style and cultural significance within graffiti, from 1960’s New York aerosol art to today’s diverse and modern street art.

Brown, Richard (2011) The evolution of style and cultural significance within graffiti, from 1960’s New York aerosol art to today’s diverse and modern street art. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation will aim to explore how traditional New York aerosol art has evolved into the diverse art form now known as street art. The first chapter shall aim to define and examine the origins of graffiti. In this chapter the works from early cave paintings to the historical significance of graffiti persevered within Pompeii shall be investigated before briefly looking into the 1960’s emergence of contemporary graffiti within New York’s. The second chapter shall analyze the motivations behind a graffiti writer’s actions as; fame, respect, poverty, racial inequality and reinvention all play a part in the continued driving force of the movement. Chapter two will also investigate the concept of moral careers and the presence of a prestige economy within the subculture and how their captivating influences can draw new writers into the subculture and keep them engaged. The third chapter shall inspect how the style of graffiti evolved, how lettering became more complex and how competition between writers led to subdivision and redefining of styles. Chapter three also explores the introduction of street art and how hip-hop media’s involvement in the spread and establishment of graffiti into an international scene. Chapter four will look into the subcultures continuing assimilation into mainstream and its move from the underground and its new uses within corporate production and advertising. It shall also examine how the associated cool-factor has lead graffiti into the public spotlight and its acceptance into the art institution. The fifth chapter of this dissertation will be investigating the public presence of graffiti and the public’s response. This chapter will analyze graffiti’s portrayal within the media and the way artist’s are using this as a publicity spring board in which to enter less legally dubious endeavours. The final chapter shall include the results of primary research investigating directly the public’s opinions on graffiti and examining just how much is known by the average person about the subculture.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Art and Design
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2012 16:40
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:10
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/9562

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