An investigation into the influence of residential dwelling design on the socio-economic characteristics of residents within the City of Portsmouth

White, Andrew (2008) An investigation into the influence of residential dwelling design on the socio-economic characteristics of residents within the City of Portsmouth. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Population growth has always been an issue but never more so than early 2008. As our cities expand to accommodate new generations, migrants, immigrants, ageing populations and an increase in single parent families, more emphasis is being placed on the performance of the current United Kingdom (UK) planning system to provide the space necessary in which to accommodate the populace within city boundaries. This investigation is concerned with the physical design of residential dwellings provided by the City of Portsmouth and how these physical design attributes can affect the populace living within them. The study explores literature to highlight the importance of social mobility and, underlines reasons for the differences in dwelling choice between socio-economic groups. It also indicates design and tenure qualities that directly influence residential environments. Research using the 2001 Census and Government statistical evidence is utilised to highlight population segregation across the City of Portsmouth with focus on socio-economic characteristics, tenure type and dwelling design. Survey samples collected from residents from contrasting wards underpin the main themes discovered in the literature review. The investigation reveals that socio-economic characteristics of residents are impacted upon both positively and negatively depending on dwelling design and tenure grouping.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: ?? EDAM ??
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/954

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