Europol’s intelligence-led policing efforts against transnational organised crime: an evaluation of the intelligence model and its implementation

Zarkadoulas, Nikos T. (2010) Europol’s intelligence-led policing efforts against transnational organised crime: an evaluation of the intelligence model and its implementation. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The dissertation aspires to investigate the understanding and the implementation of the Intelligence-Led Policing (ILP) model throughout the European Union. The research is primarily focused in Europol, the central European law-enforcement agency entrusted with the mission to put into practice the model and guide the local police agencies of the member states in combating organized crime. The purpose of the current work is to research how ILP is defined within Europol, what the quality of information shared is, how police officers perceive it in its entirety, and finally what impact it might have upon organised crime. Twenty-nine (29) intelligence analysts, experts, and liaison officers, representing all the member states and being ‘members’ of this managerial philosophy, were interviewed. Analysis of the researching findings suggests that Europol personnel are aware of the benefits, the limitations, and the features of the model in particular. There is no doubt about the usefulness of the ILP model, since drifting away from traditional policing and exploring new strategies is already a progress. However, it was found that the policing system in question is not sufficiently implemented. The research findings are perhaps a valuable contribution over the discussion about using the model against organised crime; because, a number of challenges that law enforcement agencies have to overcome are pointed out. Thus, taking into account the specific theoretical elements of ILP, it focuses on the reasons that hinder a successful outcome; namely, inadequate information sharing, the national pathologies, differentiation among the countries, as well as the complexities in identifying and eliminating key figures in transnational organised crime.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/920

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