The independent monitoring of prisons and immigration removal centres: do different kinds of custody call for different monitoring techniques?

Anderson, James I. (2010) The independent monitoring of prisons and immigration removal centres: do different kinds of custody call for different monitoring techniques? MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The law requires that every prison and immigration removal centre (IRC) in the UK is monitored by an independent board consisting of unpaid volunteers, appointed by government ministers. Official procedures, to protect the rights of people in custody, can be protracted and stressful. Independent Monitoring Boards (IMBs) offer prisoners and detainees more immediate and less formal opportunities to express their concerns. Boards are expected to interpret the concepts of fairness, respect and decency within totally different environments, yet their training is largely generic. To regard monitoring as a standard process throughout the entire custodial system would appear to be superficial. The aim of this study is therefore to critically assess whether the independent monitoring of different types of closed establishments should be tailored according to the purposes of those establishments. This aim will be carried out using the following objectives, which will also form the basis of each chapter of the study:an outline the expansion of coverage, by IMBs, of closed establishments over the last 25 years and to critically assess the impact of this on monitoring requirement and key differences between imprisonment and immigration detention in principle and practice, and critically to assess different monitoring models and their potential in different IMB environments. The study concludes that there different emphases within different kinds of establishment, but also identifies those likely to compromise the independence of the boards. Whilst the wellbeing of prisoners and detainees remains the essential focus of monitoring, the study identifies the need for boards to maintain strict impartiality and to be vigilant against threats to their independence.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/913

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