Using the Jamaican Constabulary Force (JCF) as a case study: identify the causes and consequences of police corruption and critically assess whether its new anti corruption strategy is effective

Murphy, Paul (2010) Using the Jamaican Constabulary Force (JCF) as a case study: identify the causes and consequences of police corruption and critically assess whether its new anti corruption strategy is effective. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Jamaica is a small state in the northern Caribbean with a population of approximately 2.7 million. It faces significant social and economic challenges with chronic unemployment and widespread corruption. While the formal economy remains in a stagnant state, the trade in illegal drugs and weapons has remained dynamic and achieved high levels of organisation. The political environment remains stable although the island has experienced periods of political violence. The deteriorating crime problems with high incidences of murders, rapes, shootings and carnal abuse greatly threatens Jamaica’s national security and the well being of the entire population. Corruption in the police force has become a byword in Jamaica and features regularly in the media. Corruption, physical assault, worrying levels of the use of lethal force and involvement in criminal activities are all considered common police practice by the Jamaican citizens, who remain highly suspicious and fearful of the police. While the term police corruption conjures up many images and stereotypes, it is recognised as a complex phenomenon, which does not readily submit to simple analysis. It is a problem that has and will continue to affect us all. Given the gravity of the situation, the then Commissioner of Police made it his highest priority to tackle the endemic problem of corruption in his force. Thus in January 2008 the Jamaican Constabulary Force launched its new anti-corruption strategy, which is based on a three pronged approach of detection, prevention and education. The strategy is innovative, detailed and already showing signs of success in a relatively short period of time.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/910

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