The global police cometh? The view from the frontline: an evaluation of the transnational policing subculture theory through reference to overseas liaison officers

Owen, Jeremy (2010) The global police cometh? The view from the frontline: an evaluation of the transnational policing subculture theory through reference to overseas liaison officers. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Law enforcement liaison officers based overseas have long been utilised by criminal justice organisations, however examination of criminology literature has shown that to date little specific research has been conducted into the activities and attitudes of these individuals and how they operate as a group. Previous research has acknowledged the increasingly transnational nature of law enforcement and on occasion passed comment on the importance, and corresponding rise in numbers, of Overseas Liaison Officers (OLOs) who are at the frontline of these law enforcement changes. To explore this issue further, and to specifically focus on OLOs’ role in the transnational arena, this study is based on direct access to UK OLOs, which allowed for the collection of empirical data and individual qualitative interviews to be carried out. The subsequent research has corroborated previous academic statements and also identified that individuals who act in the specialist role of an OLO often carry out tasks more academically and intellectually challenging than that routinely undertaken by uniformed officers. As a basis to this, it also provides an historical context to the subject and identifies that a number of differing law enforcement subcultural issues influence OLOs, many of whom are from none “police” organisations. This means much previous literature relating to policing subcultures may not be pertinent. That being said it has been established that through their actions, particularly surrounding their use of social networks, OLOs are establishing a separate transnational policing subculture with specific core cultural referents independent and distinct from those of their uniformed police colleagues. The most notable of these is the abrogation of the personal use of force in the transnational arena as they transform into pure knowledge workers who have greater admiration for interpersonal communication skills, than the glorification of violence. The study proposes therefore that a transnational policing subculture is being established, however it is in its nascent stage, thus much less developed than the corresponding “police” subcultures.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/897

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