The policing of organised crime in the UK: a case study of Nottingham

Parchment, Peter (2010) The policing of organised crime in the UK: a case study of Nottingham. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this thesis is to critically examine the policing of organised crime in the UK and specifically the City of Nottingham. The research focuses on a case study of the City of Nottingham set within the broader academic debates and evidence about these issues. Organised crime is a well-researched area, however little research has been completed in relation to public confidence and the policing of organised crime. What research there has been indicates that the majority of the public view trust and confidence in policing by the extent to which the police support social cohesion and order within communities. Empirical research for this study includes analysis of secondary trend data for Nottingham and interviews with key informants with different professional backgrounds or experiences in relation to organised crime. The research set out to identify and examine the police response to organised crime, the successes and perceived barriers to policing the issue. Findings from this case study are compared with other research conducted in the UK. The study found that respondents were attuned to the same views and concerns held nationally with regards to crime levels in general and media representations of these Issues. Longer prison sentences and a reluctance to give evidence in cases involving organised criminality were seen as the main barrier to tackling the problem.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/895

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