Negotiating emergent methodologies: short term case studies in teacher-technology interactions with naïve IWB users in a young learner context

Goosey, William M. (2010) Negotiating emergent methodologies: short term case studies in teacher-technology interactions with naïve IWB users in a young learner context. MA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (2127kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation details an investigation into the relationship between the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and the methodological underpinnings of English language teaching (ELT), as exemplified in the practice of a group of technologically naïve young learner (YL) practitioners in the context of supplementary language support on an intensive summer programme in Spain. The intention was to provide evidential indications in support of, or against, the premise that inexperienced IWB users let the said technology interfere with their methodological training, resulting in devalued learning experiences for children in the age range of eleven to seventeen years old. Evidence was collected in a British Council Teaching Centre, Madrid Young Learners, by using a systematized approach to a classroom observation procedure of twelve teachers, one that used lesson plans, semi-structured feedback interviews, questionnaires containing closed and open questions, and supporting background data gathered from participant job applications, in order to substantiate indications, both positive and negative. The data thus gathered on classroom practice was contrasted with a pre-defined methodological typology, describing ‘best practice’ as combining contextualized collaborative activities with functionally loaded topical relevance to provide an idealized ELT framework. In analysis of the qualitative data, little evidence was found either of IWBs leading naïve teachers to presentational style practice or of methodological classroom education bound to the typology described.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:49
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/887

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...