Building multi-unit residential developments with straw bales: is it feasible?

Carr, Philip (2010) Building multi-unit residential developments with straw bales: is it feasible? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    International pressure to cut the UK’s carbon emissions has led to the Government targeting the construction industry and the built environment. This has been enacted by increasing the standard of new building design and energy efficiency. A by-product of increasing energy efficiency has been increased build costs to the developer. Modern methods of construction have been developed to achieve a lower building cost. One such method is the use of straw bales as a wall and insulation material; however this method has been restricted to small scale, private building projects. This dissertation will explore the possibility that the commercial residential building industry can adopt straw bale as a building material and use it in a profitable manner. The feasibility of this idea will be tested by using a number of appropriate methods. Firstly it must be proven that using straw bale is a safe and effective way to build sustainable dwellings. Once this is established the data gathered will inform calculations regarding the energy efficiency and cost estimates of building a typical home. By way of comparison between a theoretical straw bale development and a “normal” cavity wall house the research will show those key differences in energy efficiency and crucially cost per square metre. Once these figures are established it will become clearer whether or not a straw bale development really is a feasible option for a commercial developer.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: ?? EDAM ??
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:16
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/869

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