An examination of motives for public perception of managed realignment: a comparison of attitudes and perceptions adjacent to completed, ongoing and proposed realignment projects in Chichester and Langstone harbours

Humphrys, Emma (2008) An examination of motives for public perception of managed realignment: a comparison of attitudes and perceptions adjacent to completed, ongoing and proposed realignment projects in Chichester and Langstone harbours. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this project was to examine public perception of managed realignment projects in Chichester and Langstone Harbours. Perceptions and attitudes were examined in relation to three project sites: a completed realignment, an ongoing realignment and a proposed realignment. This was conducted via a questionnaire survey of residents and visitors approached adjacent to each site. Respondents were asked about directly about their attitudes to managed realignment and also about their perceptions of the risks presented by climate change. Analysis showed a high level of support for managed realignment as a shoreline management technique and a good understanding of the risks presented by climate change related sea-level rise. The results suggest some concern amongst respondents relating to property rights and issues of social justice. The results demonstrated varying levels of awareness of shoreline management documents and the varying importance of different media in raising awareness these and of the projects themselves. The results also raised questions relating to the role of different agencies in the promotion of the benefits of managed retreat. The results concurred well with previous studies and identified opportunities for future work.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Geography
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 24 Jul 2015 10:00
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/854

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