'With all deliberate speed': the problems of implementing school desegregation after Brown v. Board of Education, 1954-1958

Paterson, Harriet (2012) 'With all deliberate speed': the problems of implementing school desegregation after Brown v. Board of Education, 1954-1958. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation explores the early Civil Rights Movement in the United States of America in the twentieth century. It focuses on the implications and difficulties of implementing school desegregation after the 1954 Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka landmark decision. It examines ties to international events, the political and press reaction to the decision, state overnment actions and policies, the rise of white segregationist organisations, and the role of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). By focusing on attempts to desegregate public schools in Baltimore and Little Rock, this dissertation concludes that without state and public support, the Supreme Court decision on Brown was destined to be ineffective, and may have failed completely without more forceful federal intervention and the continuing work of the NAACP to assert African-American rights.

    In order to reach conclusions on why desegregation proceeded as it did research focuses on primary sources from the period 1950-1960, including but not limited to newspaper articles, correspondence between key players, testimonies of essential activists and wider reading around the larger historical context.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Languages and Area Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2012 07:13
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 12:03
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/8261

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