Absent fathers: why some have little or no contact with their children and the consequences for these children. An analysis of the issues and the support available

Curry, Julie (2010) Absent fathers: why some have little or no contact with their children and the consequences for these children. An analysis of the issues and the support available. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Many children live with both their biological parents, although the number of those living in lone-parent families is significant and rising. Whilst some of these children continue to have a relationship with their non-resident parent, usually the father, it is not unusual for others to see them rarely, or never. This study was a literature review of the research, published between 1995 and 2010, regarding low or no father-child contact, the potential effects on children and the current support available. It determined the main causes for low or no contact were financial, father-mother relationship post-separation, father’s age, living arrangements, the legal system and emotions. Chapter 4 made links between lack of father-child contact and the effects for children including youth crime, educational achievement, anxiety, depression, an external locus of control and regret. Chapter 5 reviewed current interventions in the UK and elsewhere. Evaluations of American and Australian programmes were examined, as well as legislative interventions. The responses by the UK government to reduce the impact, on children, of parental separation were appraised. Chapter 6 made recommendations for other interventions to support families, particularly non-resident fathers, and for future research.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/819

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