An exploration of current literature to identify whether communication impairment and social exclusion are contributing factors to the development of mental health problems in adults with autism

Vinall, Amy (2010) An exploration of current literature to identify whether communication impairment and social exclusion are contributing factors to the development of mental health problems in adults with autism. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study attempts to identify whether communication impairment and social exclusion influence the vulnerability of adults with autism in developing mental health problems. Attention has been paid to the underlying causes of mental health illnesses within this client group with particular focus on ‘challenging behaviour’ and discrimination. It is suggested that the impairment of communication can involve difficulties with social interaction which can instigate ‘challenging behaviour’. The society’s portrayal of autism is dominantly influenced by discrimination and stigma, ultimately resulting in social exclusion. The aim of this study was to analyse comparative research from the academic arena, to gain an insight as to how both factors influence the mental well-being of adults with autism. The author has extracted research by using a mixed method approach of both qualitative and quantitative findings, drawing from literature on social and personal perspectives to identify how influential factors can contribute to the vulnerability. The author has made several recommendations from the findings that contribute to the need of raising awareness of autism within the general public and statutory agencies so that their mental health needs are adequately met.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/816

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