The Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003: facillitating community care or encouraging prolonged, unsafe or rushed discharges in which older persons preferences are ignored?

Leaves, Tracey (2010) The Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003: facillitating community care or encouraging prolonged, unsafe or rushed discharges in which older persons preferences are ignored? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This paper argues that the Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003 is seemingly antithetical in its implementation, particularly the Act being superimposed on the NHS and Community Care Act (1990). The writer suggests that the ideology behind the NHS and Community Care Act (1990) was not only concerned with differing philosophies about the best way to provide care, it was also concerned fundamentally with the organising and funding of services (Gorman & Postle 2003). The focus of the reforms inherent in the NHS and Community Care Act (1990) were to provide a mixed economy of care thus facilitating increased choice for service users. The ideology behind this rationale was that service users could choose from a range of services, inclusive of those services provided by private and voluntary sectors alike (Gorman & Postle 2003). The subsequent implementation of the Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003, introduced a controversial scheme whereby local authorities (social services) are charged for hospital beds (at a rate set by the hospital trust) that are taken up by patients’/service users that are waiting social services input. Within the research paper the writer discusses the inherent and polemic critiques surrounding the Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003 – many of which voice concerns around the ability of older persons being able to exercise autonomy and choice. The paper alludes to discrimination, unfairness and ageism being 'alive' today in contemporary practice. The paper explores if such an Act (Delayed Discharges) increases interagency tensions and undermines joint working, which arguably leads to a mutual culture of blame and buck passing: or does such an Act strengthen working relations whereby two agencies are determined to work together to avoid implementing the Delayed Discharge fines, as they recognise that monies would be more wisely spent in jointly developing appropriate services. The overall aim of the research paper is to determine whether the Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act 2003 prolongs and increases rushed untimely discharges whereby older persons’ preferences are seemingly ignored.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/804

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