Dual diagnosis of mental health and substance misuse: an exploration of service structure and service provision in the United Kingdom (UK)

Tutesigensi, Enid (2010) Dual diagnosis of mental health and substance misuse: an exploration of service structure and service provision in the United Kingdom (UK). MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Research suggests that a dual diagnosis of mental health and substance misuse has a negative impact, not only on the individual experiencing the disorder but also on society as a whole. Studies also indicate that dual diagnosis disorder is very complex as it is not clear which of the disorders came first. Despite this, in the UK, both mental health and substance misuse services operate separately from each other. This dissertation aims to explore why mental health and substance misuse services are structured the way they currently are and, given the complexity associated with dual diagnosis disorder, to discover what the service provisions are for affected patients. During the writing of this dissertation, a review of literature from previous related studies, based in and outside the UK, was carried out. The writer sourced a number of databases including: Medline, psycLIT and ASSIA, and also searched the university catalogue for relevant books and e-journals. The review was based on the aims and objectives of this dissertation which then formed the dissertation chapters and sections. The result from the review suggests that mental health and substance misuse services in the UK have evolved separately and that government efforts to promote joint working through policy implementation have been resisted due to: lack of knowledge of the co-existing disorder, different approaches, and differences in funding, to mention just a few. This has created a ‘ping pong’ effect for dually diagnosed patients who are trying to access services. Evidence suggests that both services are reluctant to treat these patients, hence there is a high possibility that they will fall through the net of care.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/786

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