An investigation into the potential benefits of drama for young people: with particular reference to the Phat Drama club and the work of 20th and 21st century practitioners

Ayliffe, Kate (2009) An investigation into the potential benefits of drama for young people: with particular reference to the Phat Drama club and the work of 20th and 21st century practitioners. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This essay aims to explore some of the many claims that have been made for drama, particularly regarding the benefits that it may, or may not, be able to provide for young people. The essay aims to weigh up varying arguments made by professionals within the field, but with conclusions also being reached through practical investigation within the drama group, Phat Drama, for young people aged thirteen to eighteen. The essay offers statements both arguing the power of creativity for providing emotional release, growth and learning but also the counter argument regarding the seeming loss of interest in dramatic technique within these theories and the difficulty in proving that drama really can benefit the participant. It will also offer a response to the common detachment of ‘drama’ from is performance based sister ‘theatre’ and argue that there is still a need for both to sit hand in hand when aiming to provide any emotional or technical benefits to teenagers in particular. This study aims to challenge the reader and the (drama) teacher/leader to consider the effective use of drama as a learning tool or a means of growth but yet urges him/her to consider the prospect that not one theory should be followed religiously and that perhaps even drama itself does not have all the answers.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/767

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