Nation of drinkers: a critical exploration into the rise of British binge drinking, the night time economy, and the inherent implications to community safety

Williams, Christopher P. (2009) Nation of drinkers: a critical exploration into the rise of British binge drinking, the night time economy, and the inherent implications to community safety. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (226kB)

    Abstract

    Britain’s heavy drinking culture costs the nation an estimated £20 billion a year through ill health, crime and disorder. Following a change of licensing regulations in the 1990s, a huge increase in the number of town centre bars took place. However, the new bars prompted increased drinking and came with unforeseen consequences in respect of community safety and policing. Despite the huge media interest and numerous initiatives implemented by the government, this subject area remains relatively new and under-researched. This dissertation explores the rise in binge drinking and the subsequent challenges to community safety. It evaluates the legislation introduced by the government, most notably The Licensing Act (2003). The dissertation is essentially split into two main sections, a literature review along with a critique of government initiatives, followed by a case study that largely agrees with national trends. The research concludes that the host of new legislation has been largely unsuccessful, is under used and requires additional funding to make it effective. The dissertation also identifies an emerging shift in drinking culture towards town centre drinking for the young, resulting in out of town pubs closing and an increase in drinking at home.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/737

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...