Capacity to care: an analysis of the barriers and drivers for ensuring consistent service provision for social care users during periods of increased demand

Hatton, Linda (2009) Capacity to care: an analysis of the barriers and drivers for ensuring consistent service provision for social care users during periods of increased demand. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    With a Government focus on choice and independence comes a greater expectation that vulnerable people who need assistance should no longer be institutionalised but should remain in their own homes with domiciliary care services provided there for them. There is also additional pressure to ensure that hospital delayed discharges are kept to a minimum and that discharge is facilitated by appropriate and timely services. The consequences of these dual expectations is a greater reliance upon independent sector care agencies to provide home care services. Evidence from the literature however, indicates some reservations as to their ability to meet demand at times of higher need such as the winter pressure period. This paper presents an explorative investigation of the way in which domiciliary care agencies manage their staffing arrangements and the drivers and barriers to meeting market demand. The participants consisted of 194 domiciliary care agencies providing services in and around Hampshire. The study used a quantitative methodology and the data collection tool was a postal questionnaire. A response rate of 34% was achieved. Although several themes consistent with existing literature were evident, new areas of understanding were also identified. Many complex and inter-related barriers and drivers that evolve from the geographic location, market economy, political agenda and labour market were identified. Not all of the findings were consistent with the evidence in the literature. The cohort of independent sector care agencies used in this study may not be representative of those across the UK as the majority did not have the difficulties in providing services at times of higher need that the literature suggests. Caution must be used in generalising the results of this study to the entire UK as there is evidence of contributory factors which suggest dissimilarity in the way social care is funded and managed, providing possible regional variations in the way independent sector care agencies can fulfil their service provision.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/718

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