It has been suggested that in recent years the content of MMORPG games is becoming increasingly “dumbed down”. To what extent is this true, and what effects are the changes having on the communities

McDougall, Arran (2011) It has been suggested that in recent years the content of MMORPG games is becoming increasingly “dumbed down”. To what extent is this true, and what effects are the changes having on the communities. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The aim of this dissertation is to investigate the current state of the massively multiplayer online role playing game. Critics of the genre in recent years have scrutinised industry wide developments to the genres content and make the claim that the genre is becoming increasingly “dumbed down”. A term which is generally perceived by subscribers to have negative connotations. This dissertation draws upon a wide range of critical and academic writings in order to attempt to put together a rounded discussion on the topic in order to gauge the current trends of the genre.

    As those familiar with the genre will know, MMORPG games are home to large scale communities. Previously only small amounts of research have been carried out on the social interactions that happen within these games, and few still that attempt to understand how changes to the industry are effecting the social structures of those who participate in these online worlds. It is for this reason that this dissertation sets out to ethnographically study a small sample of players in an attempt to monitor this reaction to change, and gain an insight into how the community is responding to current trends.

    Once findings and results are analysed and discussed, this dissertation moves on to make a few educated predictions for the MMORPG genre and its future, based on some of the views expressed throughout the study.

    The dissertation is then drawn to a close with concluding points and a call for further research into the topic.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2012 10:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:58
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/7010

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