Propaganda, the media and the Iraq War: how the British and American governments created and sustained support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq

D'Cunha, Rebecca (2011) Propaganda, the media and the Iraq War: how the British and American governments created and sustained support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    For the past ten years, since the events of September 11th, there has been a considerable amount of information concerning the war in Iraq in the media. This study attempts to reveal how much of the information presented to the British and American public was factual, and also looks at how both governments controlled the amount of nformation that was available in the media. Focusing on events before, during and after the Iraq war, this study will be able to look at how the information provided through the media helped to create and sustain public support, as well as change the ways in which people within Western societies think and behave. Firstly, the work will focus on how British and American governments withheld information from the public about the reasons why they wanted to go to war in Iraq. By doing this, the media could only present information that made the Western world look like victims, and therefore have the right to go to war. After this the work looks at how figures such as Saddam Hussein were demonized in the press in order to create fear and support. It will argue that the methods used are known to be propaganda tools that were used in previous times, such as the Cold War. The last chapter will look at the consequences of using propaganda like techniques in the media in order to control public opinion, especially focusing on the increasing acceptability of Islamaphobia in the Western world. The dissertation concludes that through the control of information in the media by Western governments, the public have misconceptions concerning the Iraq war, and freedom of opinion is being compromised.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2012 14:43
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:58
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/6994

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