How might American silent slapstick film be seen as a political tool? Considering the theories of the Frankfurt School and recent developments in media

Jackson, Alice (2011) How might American silent slapstick film be seen as a political tool? Considering the theories of the Frankfurt School and recent developments in media. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This project explores the ways in which early slapstick film, which is chiefly silent, can be seen as a political tool. A detailed investigation of how this is the case in Charlie Chaplin’s film Modern Times (1936) is made. This draws upon the work of the Frankfurt School associates, specifically Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin and Max Horkheimer, who cultivated their theory at the same time as silent slapstick film was being produced, and in response to contemporary developments in culture. The study is brought up to date with a consideration of recent changes to the culture industry, contemplating new new media, and how this affects the viewing and interpretation of early slapstick.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2012 14:11
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:57
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/6910

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