The reality of RFID technologies in academic libraries: using an individual case study and nationwide survey to investigate RFIDs potential.

Nightingale, Gareth (2009) The reality of RFID technologies in academic libraries: using an individual case study and nationwide survey to investigate RFIDs potential. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This report examines the potential of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology within the academic library environment, in particular that of the University of Portsmouth's' as currently this technologies popularity is experiencing a gain in momentum with libraries becoming more open to the benefits that it can bring. This report investigates the positive and negative effects that RFID technology could harbour for an organisation attempting to implement it, its common uses, the barriers to its use and any key issues associated with organisational change. The aim is to use robust research such as a nationwide survey covering the entire United Kingdom, detailed literature review and staff interviews with the underpinnings of Mumford's ETHICS systems analysis methodology in order to enable the Author to suggest reasonable RFID action plans for the University of Portsmouth's academic library. Robust is the key word within this report as it is the Authors for the publication of a discussion paper to be a possibility. As a result of the investigations it was learned that a large proportion of UK academic libraries have adopted RFID technology, with the rest either seriously considering or already planning a future project involving it. It was discovered that the main driver behind any hesitation to implement are the costs and time involved with such a large project, which the majority of non users simply have yet to own a sufficient amount of. As well as indentifying some key facts such as the current state of adoption The Author concludes with a series of suggestions for the University of Portsmouth's academic library and draws from the research a series of best practices for which it is believed any RFID implementation would benefit from, along with commenting on some of the wider issues uncovered.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Computing
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:15
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/681

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