A literature review investigating the possible use of hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy as a multimodality treatment for cancer.

Möller, Larissa (2009) A literature review investigating the possible use of hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy as a multimodality treatment for cancer. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Interest for hyperthermia was sparked when attending elective placement at a leading radiotherapy department in Germany, which is using hyperthermia as a standard adjunct to a variety of radiotherapy treatments in a large number of patients. Upon further research of this treatment modality it became apparent that it is commonly used in mainland Europe and North America, but not available at all in the United Kingdom (UK). Clinically induced hyperthermia is the heating of tissue to 40-45 degrees Celius. Hyperthermia alone has cytotoxic properties and used together with radiotherapy, a variety of synergistic effects make hyperthermia a strong radiosensitiser especially when used for bulky tumours. The aim of this project was to investigate in the form of a literature review if the use of hyperthermia together with radiotherapy has proven to be an effective multimodality treatment for cancer. A literature search was conducted using a range of sources including journals, books and electronic databases. The search strategy was based on the PICO model and identified literature was screened for relevance and the chosen papers critically appraised for their quality and validity based on predetermined evaluation tools. The evidence gained from the literature, points towards a benefit from the addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy in some cancers. Improved survival, local control and palliation were seen in most trials, if not always statistically significant. The treatment related acute and long-term side-effects for hyperthermia were of an acceptable level. Whilst the heating techniques were notably improved in the more recent trials, further improvements especially regarding thermometry need to be made. Unfortunately, the trials and reviews evaluated were of sometimes rather poor quality and small sample sizes mean that the evidence is limited and that more, larger randomly controlled trials need to be conducted, closely following recognized guidelines to establish the potential of hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/655

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