Are the potential long term adverse effects of high acoustic diagnostic medical ultrasound suitably understood by operating clinicians/sonographers?

Tomkowicz, David (2009) Are the potential long term adverse effects of high acoustic diagnostic medical ultrasound suitably understood by operating clinicians/sonographers? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This study is an analysis and evaluation of published and electronic literature focussing around the adverse effects caused by medical ultrasound. The motivation for the review came as the result of researching an assignment in which the safety concerns of imaging modalities were explored. It was discovered that there are discrepancies among professional opinion about the safety concerns of ultrasound. It was therefore decided to review further literature so that a supported opinion could be developed and gaps in knowledge identified. Recommendations for future research could then be made. Ultrasound is a medical imaging modality which uses sound wave echoes to create diagnostic images. It was initially considered safe in comparison to modalities which utilise radiation because patients receiving an ultrasound examination are not subjected to ionising radiation, however, since its introduction to the medical imaging world four decades ago concerns regarding the adverse effects have continued to grow particularly in the light of evidence from more extensive use. This review will firstly look at the history of medical ultrasound to include its introduction, and expanding use throughout the years. It will also consider epidemiology and limitations as well as the rationale for conducting the review on the topic chosen. The review will outline the biophysical mechanisms of ultrasound and will continue by discussing previous studies conducted that investigate adverse effects, including epidemiological studies and laboratory research. The issues explored will then be discussed, conclusions made and personal opinion expressed. From analysis of the discussion, the hypothesis will be accepted or rejected. Recommendations and implications for future practice will then be made.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > School of Health Sciences and Social Work
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/653

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