What's so critical about critical incidents? Critical incident management in policing

Clark, Sarah P. (2008) What's so critical about critical incidents? Critical incident management in policing. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The overall purpose of this thesis is to explore critical incident management in policing as well as comparing and contrasting critical incident management within three police service areas. It is a worthwhile task to research this area as there is a lack of research studies on the subject of critical incidents and the management of them. The research was approached using grounded theory and was collated using a mixture of primary and secondary data. This study reviews the available existing and relevant literature concerned with what critical incidents are and how they are managed effectively and also explores the main issues that arose from the data collected. The main findings from this study included issues around the effective identification of a critical incident linking to the decision-making of police personnel, procedure, support and training. While comparing three police service areas this thesis found that the main difference between these police forces is in their use of critical incident management procedure and guidelines. This study also found that many of the main resources implemented to successfully manage a critical incident are used as part of routine policing. As a result of the main findings this thesis concludes with a discussion on the main issues found and debates the importance of critical incidents. This thesis brings these findings together to discuss if a critical incident management agenda is in fact necessary.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/620

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