Eyewitness perceptions: the effects of perceived likeability and masculinity on false identifications

Turner, Nicola (2007) Eyewitness perceptions: the effects of perceived likeability and masculinity on false identifications. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    False eyewitness identifications can have grave consequences such as the innocent being condemned, or the guilty escaping punishment, and it has been claimed that eyewitness identification is a proven source of mistaken convictions (Howitt, 2006). For this reason, it is important to understand the factors which can affect false identifications. This study explored the ways in which witnesses' perceptions might affect false identifications in a line-up situation. The effects of perceived likeability and masculinity on false identifications were explored through a mock line-up identification. The effects of these factors on confidence in identification were also examined. Perceived likeability was found to affect identification choices; those who were considered to be less likeable were identified as the perpetrator of the crime more often than those who were considered to be highly likeable. There also appeared to be a relationship between perceived masculinity and identification choices; those who were considered to be highly masculine were identified as the perpetrator of the crime more often than those who were considered to be less masculine. Perceived likeability and masculinity did not appear to affect confidence levels. These results are discussed with reference to related research.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Science > Department of Psychology
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/617

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