The demand for talented teachers: recruiting and retaining teachers in a competitive market

Dilbert-Davis, Glenda (2007) The demand for talented teachers: recruiting and retaining teachers in a competitive market. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Growing enrollments, pending retirements, and educational reform initiatives have given rise to an increasing demand for teachers in globally in public schools, while the supply of teachers has been declining over the decades. Already the teaching profession must compete with a shrinking pool of young talented teachers at a time when the attractiveness of school-level teaching as a career is declining. Teachers are typically being asked to do more work for less reward. Salaries are falling compared with other professionals, while our knowledge-based societies are placing new demands on teachers' abilities. Faced with these problems, ensuring that there will be enough skilled and talented teachers to educate all children becomes an issue of major importance to policymakers. Subsequently, there is widespread public dissatisfaction with the state of education in the face of a deep teacher-recruitment and retention crisis and a growing sense of declining standards. The immediate effect of a shortage is more likely to lower quality of teachers and relax qualifications requirements. In either case, the quality of teaching and learning suffers. Many of those who decide to join the teaching profession leave for other jobs long before reaching retirement age. The situation is grave; therefore Governments need to act now to make the profession more attractive. Specific policies affecting financial incentives, working conditions, professional development, and overall job satisfaction are needed if serious shortages are to be avoided. It would be unfortunate if the demand for quality in today's school systems and indeed the pressing demands of the knowledge-based economics were to be subverted by teacher shortages. The research paper aims to look at factors affecting recruitment and retention of talented teachers, as well as the impact that employee job satisfaction makes in these areas.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Portsmouth Business School > Organisational Studies and Human Resources Management
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/614

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