The long term use of smart meters with real-time devices in domestic properties within the United Kingdom: an evaluation of the effect on consumer behaviour and electricity consumption

Casswell, Donne (2011) The long term use of smart meters with real-time devices in domestic properties within the United Kingdom: an evaluation of the effect on consumer behaviour and electricity consumption. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (2668kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation advances the understanding of long term use of smart meters and real-time devices (RTDs) in domestic properties within the United Kingdom. The effects on consumer behaviour and electricity consumption were evaluated.

    This research was based on a review of literature including the Energy Demand Research Project that included over 27 000 household, the largest study of its kind in the UK. Comparable international feedback experiments were evaluated, interviews were conducted and questionnaires were carried out on consumers who had used smart meters and RTDs for more than two years. Half hourly smart meter readings allowed for the analysis of over two years worth of energy consumption, to make it possible to analyse the long term effect on energy usage. This was identified as a gap in the literature.

    The research concluded that there is typically a reduction in electricity consumption, following the use of RTDs. Changes in consumption and behaviour were attributed to RTDs being a form of direct feedback of the electricity used within the property, thereby making energy usage visible, enabling consumers to link their behaviour to the amount of electricity used.

    The main findings of the research indicated financial incentives were the primary motive for using RTDs and the primary motive to change behaviour included financial incentives and greater understanding of electricity consumption. The savings made by changing behaviour and energy usage were greatest at the beginning of the two year trial, this was attributed to the Hawthorne and/or Novelty effect.

    This research is particularly timely given the UK Government’s aim to have smart meters installed in most domestic and business properties by 2019.

    The recommendations of this research are that the use of RTDs in buildings should be encouraged as they raise awareness of energy usage and facilitate a reduction in energy consumption.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2012 15:05
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:53
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/6097

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...