Higher Education Role Analaysis (HERA): is it about role, competencies or performance or just an equal pay compliance tool? An investigation into academic and management staff perceptions

Russell, Kelly (2006) Higher Education Role Analaysis (HERA): is it about role, competencies or performance or just an equal pay compliance tool? An investigation into academic and management staff perceptions. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    Job evaluation schemes have evolved during the last two decades and are used within organisations as a method to evaluate jobs. Job evaluation schemes rely on effective integration with strategic human resource management processes. Successful implementation of a job evaluation scheme will be determined by understanding of its objectives, effective integration with other strategic processes and its impact on staff. The University of Portsmouth (UoP) employs approximately 3,000 staff providing quality teaching and support for approximately 20,000 students. UoP implemented a job evaluation scheme, Higher Education Role Analysis (HERA) in August 2005 for all staff; categorised as Academic, Research and Support. The highest proportion of staff employed is academic staff at approximately 1,200 this includes staff on part time hourly paid contracts. This study therefore, focuses on academic staff understanding of HERA's objectives, HERA's contribution to the achievement of the HR Strategy and HERA's impact on academic staff in general. Semi-structured interviews were used to gather primary data from academic staff and key informants to gain a greater understanding of academic staff perspective relating to HERA's objectives, HERA's achievement of the HR Strategy and their perception of its impact on them generally. A significant finding was that academic staff perceive HERA has met three of the eleven sated objectives within the UoP HR Strategy which relate specifically to equal pay for work of equal value. Another significant finding is that HERA has had a limited impact on academic staff as a group. A major conclusion is the mixed perceptions of academic staff and key informants that UoP management were not entirely clear about HERA's multiple objectives. Residual questions raised from this research will need to be considered by UoP management.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Portsmouth Business School > Organisational Studies and Human Resources Management
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/607

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