Eco-morphosis

Gardener, David (2008) Eco-morphosis. MA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    "Environmental design works with climate rather than against it, using available air and/or earth and/or water to cool, and solar radiation and recovered heat to warm. An ever-increasing range of techniques and technologies have been either uncovered or discovered to achieve 'low energy' buildings, that is, buildings consuming a low amount of fossil fuel relative to conventional buildings of the same size and function. Many of the techniques are traditional, some of the technologies highly advanced, and choices between the poles of tradition and innovation are not necessarily made for purely environmental reasons. There is an ideological agenda driving an architect who opts for an earth roof over one loaded with photovoltaics (silicon cells that convert solar radiation into electricity). Environmental design has its own logic, much of it ethically driven. Those architects rigorous enough to follow this logic to its conclusion tend towards an environmental determinism, some of it quite elegant, in which form and strategy are kept as simple as possible. For them, it would be unethical to do otherwise." (Hagan, 2001, p. 10) The term "eco-morphosis" derived through a discussion with Dr. Elena Douvlou, who pointed out that throughout the history of the built environment, sustainable architecture has existed around the world, and in many cases, evolving its morphology over time. Energy efficient and environmentally friendly buildings will become increasingly important for everyone, for many reasons and architects will have to respond with designs that are ethically responsible and aesthetically pleasant.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > Portsmouth School of Architecture
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/594

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