A study into how the film and television industries have responded to the rapidly developing field of online media distribution and the underlying problems with methods currently being used

Staples, Gaetan (2008) A study into how the film and television industries have responded to the rapidly developing field of online media distribution and the underlying problems with methods currently being used. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    In the early 2000s, the music industry failed to embrace the potential of using the Internet as a distribution channel and consequently suffered. This dissertation is a study examining how the film and television industry have responded to the rapidly developing area of online entertainment distribution. Issues regarding piracy and illegal practices were initially examined; however, the study concentrates on methods that the industries are using to initiate the process of converging traditional and Internet media distribution. The study identifies several possible conclusions; however, it highlights the fact that the progression of this type of convergence relies on the much needed improvement and development of Internet infrastructures. Once achieved, the potential for the film and television industries to use the Internet as a distribution channel will be vastly improved. It is also concluded that instead of trying to compete with online content, the industries are actively trying to bridge the gap between traditional and online-based visual entertainment by providing the consumer with more alternatives than have been possible before. It is clear that the film and television industries have been able to avoid some of the problems faced by the music industry by learning from its misfortune. However, as technology progresses, so do associated problems. Therefore, it is suggested that the film and television industries continue to take positive and progressive action, whilst being aware of the associated technical problems.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Creative Technologies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/587

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