Are new military medical recruits millennial learners? A critical evaluation of the technical experience and learning styles of today's new military medical learners and the implications for the delivery of operational capability

Bell, Jo (2008) Are new military medical recruits millennial learners? A critical evaluation of the technical experience and learning styles of today's new military medical learners and the implications for the delivery of operational capability. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    "Unless we make a conscious effort to find out what they're looking for - and how we can provide it - it's easy to become disconnected from the quickly evolving youth market" (Jackson, 2008, p. 68). Given that people are often considered to be the most important source of competitive advantage that an organisation can have, and given the recruitment and retention difficulties that are presented in times of sharp demographic change, optimising the contribution that staff can make to an organisation at the same time as meeting their needs is an increasingly important balancing act that organisations must undertake. This study focuses on the importance of aligning the delivery of education and training to learners' learning styles in getting the most out of them and explores whether the concept of the millennial learner, i.e. someone born since 1982 whose learning styles have been altered by his or her exposure to evolving technologies, is prevalent within the Defence Medical Services' new non-commissioned recruits. Following a literature review which creates a characterisation of the millennial learner, it undertakes questionnaire-based primary research to ascertain the degree to which the sample's technological ability, experience and general learning preferences correspond to the assertions from the literature. It also examines the implications that evolving learning styles could have on the Defence Medical Services' operational capability. It concludes that the sample shows a strong correlation with the characteristics evident from the literature, i.e. they have a proven technical ability, and a familiarity and capability with a broad range of technologies that they have used for learning and/or for pleasure. In terms of their general learning preferences, they prefer experiential group-based learning. The study then makes a series of recommendations that propose greater alignment of the delivery of learning opportunities with the students' stated learning preferences; these recommendations cover enhancements to the delivery of learning opportunities, staff development and infrastructure improvements.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Portsmouth Business School > Organisational Studies and Human Resources Management
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/580

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