Can the benefits of data sharing be successfully achieved by law enforcement agencies tackling financial crime in a society that values the right to privacy?

Gilbert, Michael C. (2011) Can the benefits of data sharing be successfully achieved by law enforcement agencies tackling financial crime in a society that values the right to privacy? MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This dissertation examines whether the benefits of data sharing be successfully achieved by law enforcement agencies tackling financial crime in a society that values the right to privacy. In doing so, it examines the benefits of, and barriers to, data sharing by law enforcement and analyses the tensions between data sharing and privacy. The underlying research was based upon a literature review of relevant academic publications, primary interviews with those in law enforcement and related areas, and a documentary analysis of relevant UK Government publications since 1999.

    This research found that data sharing provides significant advantages to law enforcement. It aids crime prevention and detection, contributes to the estimation of sums lost to fraud in the UK annually, assists effective counter fraud investigations and helps to co-ordinate the response to pan national crimes such as computer fraud and money laundering (Boba, Weisburd and Meeker, 2009; Levi and Burrows, (2008); (Brookes, Moss and Pease, 2003; UK Attourney General’s Office, 2006; Maguire, Morgan and Reiner, 2007).

    However, data sharing has problems. It is hampered by complex legislation Department for Constiturional Affairs, (2003) and privacy and consent issues (Thomas and Walport, 2008). It also suffers from a lack of common data definitions and formats Boba et al, (2009), isolated information silos Kennedy, (2007) and insecure transmission methods (Smith, 2004). These have led to calls for improved leadership Brookes et al, (2003) and information governance (Smith, Seigleman and Swarup, 2008).

    This research found that the benefits of data sharing have been achieved by UK law enforcement when tackling financial crime. However, more remains to be done to simplify the framework within which such data sharing has taken place and create a consensual position where the benefits of information exchange are reconciled with a level of privacy intrusion that will be accepted by society.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2011 13:47
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:50
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5691

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