A critical review of the rural crime literature of Australia and England and Wales

Holmes, Alexandra (2011) A critical review of the rural crime literature of Australia and England and Wales. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This critical review of the rural crime literature of England and Wales, has a threefold aim, namely to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the rural crime literature in Australia and England and Wales, with a view to addressing the lack of centrality of rural issues within criminology, and examining how this affects rural criminology’s influence in a wider context.

    This aim is achieved by reviewing the existing literature, and identifying the methodological and theoretical problems encountered, when studying rural crime as a distinct phenomenon. It is argued that these factors are partly responsible for the lack of centrality of rural issues within criminology, and consequently, are also partly responsible for the lack of a strong, rural criminological knowledge base. The review then moves on to examine the substantive areas, which have been researched by criminologists, and discovers that all areas of rural criminological interest, could be argued to be under-researched.

    Having established that there is a relative lack of rural criminological research, the review moves on to consider what difficulties rural criminology faces, when trying to influence public opinion, the media and policy-makers, and considers the impact that rural criminology has on these circles. It achieves this through a discussion, and brief examination, of the policy-making process and recent policy, as well as through an introductory content analysis of the portrayal of rural crime coverage in national newspapers.

    The review concludes that, the neglect of rural criminology, and the consequent lack of a robust evidence base, has a significant, and negative, impact on rural criminology’s ability to inform discussion, both within the academy, and further afield, in media and policy-making circles.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2011 13:25
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:50
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5683

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