Industrial espionage: a pilot study to ascertain what actions have been taken to limit the impact of this threat, notably in the UK, and what scope there is for a more robust response

Poole, Daniel (2011) Industrial espionage: a pilot study to ascertain what actions have been taken to limit the impact of this threat, notably in the UK, and what scope there is for a more robust response. MSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This research investigates the subject of industrial espionage in detail and examines how this threat is being addressed particularly in the UK, but also in the USA and more generally in the Western world. The research reveals the interesting and thought-provoking perceptions and attitudes predominantly of security minded individuals in the UK and USA. It highlights the growing nature of this insidious menace, which as long ago as 1996 was widely reported to be causing an estimated loss to US industry of $2 billion a month. There are unmistakable indications that, in the absence of a coherent response form governments and industry, the situation is becoming more serious as each year passes. This is particularly evident when seen in the light of the more sophisticated attacks now being perpetrated, especially as a result of the growing reliance on the Internet and the enormous proliferation of its use. Despite this disturbing scenario, the international response, including that of the UK, surprisingly continues to be piecemeal. In addition to describing the current situation, which highlights how this severe threat can impact on the well-being of a nation and its national security, this dissertation also contains several recommendations for future UK action.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > Institute of Criminal Justice Studies
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2011 10:27
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:50
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5667

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