MGM musicals from the golden era; a study of stars, glamour and audiences

Maynard, Rebecca (2008) MGM musicals from the golden era; a study of stars, glamour and audiences. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    MGM was the most successful studio in Hollywood, between the years 1930 to the early 1950s. Musicals were the studio's greatest output and dominated the films being produced by the studio during that time. The aim of this dissertation is to discover why the studio was so successful and how it made such an impact on audiences. This will be achieved by studying the manufacturing process of stars, the glamour of the studio and the reactions of audiences. Musicals will be used as a source of primary research to enhance the evidence of how the studio reached its success. The study of these three components will uncover information about how the studios created and controlled their stars, turning them into commodities. Audiences took great interest in the stars, who influenced not only the audience's choice of film, but many other aspects of their lives. As stars endorsed products, they encouraged audiences to consume goods and try to copy their star images. Audiences took great interest in the lives of the stars, in attempts to try and aspire to live as the stars did. As primary research into fan magazines shows, fans enjoyed the fabricated illusions of the star as perfect beings. This was greatly enhanced through the glamorous look of the Hollywood musicals, which displayed notions of wealth, beauty and luxury in a utopian sense. This work will conclude how MGM utilised its stars and glamorous image, in order to create such an impact on audiences from the 1930s-50s.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/565

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