One text to rule them all: The significance of personal attachment, community, and conflict in "The Lord of the Rings" fandom

Watson, Katie (2008) One text to rule them all: The significance of personal attachment, community, and conflict in "The Lord of the Rings" fandom. BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

[img] PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (113kB)

    Abstract

    This dissertation was inspired by my own passion for the books and films of "The Lord of the Rings" and by a desire to examine the wider context and aspects of the film fandom. This has been done by looking at the work of academics who have studied fan reception, such as Henry Jenkins, Matt Hills and Lincoln Geraghty, and this forms the basis of the investigation. From it a sense of the intense personal relationship fans form with the text has been built up and their significance has been explored further by looking at specific LotR fan academic studies, such those of Kirsten Pullen and Jennifer Brayton. This also leads onto discussing the activities of the fan community, which forms when fans come together to share their attachments to the text. Within this community they are found to produce meaning, participate in fan activities, and support each other both emotionally and creatively, as shown by research on Internet fan forums. However, as the work of John Fiske, Mark Jancovich and Nathan Hunt reveals, the fan community also demonstrates discrimination and rivalry, through the formation of subgroups and competition to gain cultural capital. Finally, this is argued to be exacerbated within LotR fandom due to the need for fans to reassert their own personal attachments in the vast and rapidly expanded fan community of the LotR text due to the release of Peter Jackson's blockbuster trilogy.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/552

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads

    More statistics for this item...