IT training

Mercer, Charlotte (2008) IT training. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    IT Training in today's business world forms the backbone for many organisations, improving productivity and employee motivation. The process of organising training is a long one, with many aspects to be considered, including resources, costs, availability and timescales. If done incorrectly, businesses can suffer, making this process an invaluable one for all involved. This project will aim to investigate the IT training process, in particular looking at the customisation and processes used by businesses and the possible learning styles of trainees. These styles can differ for every person, incorporating areas of auditory, visual and kinaesthetic learning abilities, all of which are imperative to the success of training, and which will be outlined in chapter 2. As McGehee and Thayer (1961) suggest, frameworks can be made from the many different ways of developing a training plan, as long as it incorporates organisation, task and person analysis to outline all of the businesses needs against the training needed for each job role, related to the trainees who require the training. This is the basis of the IT Training process which chapter 3 will aim to consider, including the many different methods of needs assessment, analysis and training delivery available today. Chapter 3 will bring together primary research captured in the form of professional IT trainer interviews, and results gathered from questionnaires asked at Reading Scientific Services Limited (RSSL), the case study for this project. The concluding chapters will aim to discuss these issues in a broader context. Findings will show the inability for there to be one method of IT training in all businesses due to the sole dependence on each individual businesses needs. Conclusions made for RSSL's training will suggest that although it is currently successful, improvements can be made in areas of training organisation to ensure the right people attend the right course for their needs.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Computing
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/542

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