Controlling the impacts of student households on residential neighbourhoods in Portsmouth: is legislation the most effective method of achieving balanced and sustainable communities?

Guild, Douglas (2011) Controlling the impacts of student households on residential neighbourhoods in Portsmouth: is legislation the most effective method of achieving balanced and sustainable communities? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The past decade has seen a significant rise in those studying in Higher Education. A paradox has emerged, with the Labour government’s vision of‘Sustainable communities’ sitting somewhat uneasily alongside the promotion of students participating in higher education. The increasing student numbers causes similar process to that of gentrification, creating a topical subject for discussion.

    Current government policies appear to inadequately regulate problemsassociated with neighbourhoods becoming predominantly student populated. This increases the necessity for further exploration into avenues of creating more cohesive, sustainable communities.

    The synthesis of primary and secondary research has helped establish the attitudes and opinions of students and residents with Portsmouth. Information reveals that both the opposing populations agree segregated communities exist, which highlights the need for a pro-active approach to eradicate such boundaries.

    Conclusively, wider emphasis should be put on non-legislative approaches to dealing with the problems such as educating and working at a local level to address and tackle issues and enhance relationships within communities.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2011 17:03
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:48
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5385

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