The demand for sustainable homes: how are UK housbuilders responding?

Cracknell, Andrew (2011) The demand for sustainable homes: how are UK housbuilders responding? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The study was initially focused on the collection of literature to show why it has been important to incorporate sustainable practices into the production of houses, evaluate the current framework that regulates sustainable construction and identify the sustainable building techniques and technologies that are available to use by British house builders.

    Primary research was undertaken in the form of a public perception survey and a questionnaire that was sent to developers and housing associations. The public survey was conducted on the streets of Portsmouth and included a sample of 50 people. The survey was a tool to obtain two sets of information including the demographic of the respondents and to assess public demand for sustainable homes. In addition 120 questionnaires were sent to house builders to assess the sustainability of the homes that they are producing.

    By critically analysing the data, conclusions and recommendations were created to outline the response of the British house builders to the growing demand for sustainable homes. As a result is was found that house builders have shown willingness to incorporate sustainable design into their house building programme, however on average house builders are not far exceeding what is required of them in the Building Regulations. It was discovered that the main barrier to sustainable development is financial, especially in the case of developers who must ensure the profitability of their homes for the shareholders.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2011 16:44
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:48
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5380

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