The advantages and disadvantages of the government's eco-town policy: is there an alternative?

Kiner, Sushvinder (2011) The advantages and disadvantages of the government's eco-town policy: is there an alternative? BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The UK Government has carbon emission reduction targets of at least 34% by 2020 in order to defend against the threats of climate change. The way is which this target could be achieved has been planned and documented through several Government proposals, one of which being the development of UK eco-towns. These eco-towns pioneer in representing carbon and energy reduction, and assist in reaching Government housing targets. The aim of this report is to analyse the policies with particular regard for land selection and use, and to evaluate how successful or where these policies are limited.

    The main findings were that deciding on the ideal location of an eco-town cannot necessarily be applied through strict policies but each town should be assessed on its own merits and not tried to fit into a specific category. The public perception on the topic of eco-towns indicate that even once eco-towns are built and in use they will not be most efficiently lived in. this is due to the misconceptions surrounding eco-towns and climate change.

    The investigation was carried out using secondary literature studies and primary public questionnaires and interviews with field experts. The aim of such research methods was to understand the logical expert opinions on matters as well as the general users and potential residents’ views. The research project uses the data collected to answer the objectives which conclude the overall dissertation title.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2011 16:14
    Last Modified: 29 Jun 2017 16:29
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5375

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