Learning to be sustainable: the use of timber for educational buildings in the United Kingdom

Beahan, Joseph (2011) Learning to be sustainable: the use of timber for educational buildings in the United Kingdom. BSc dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    This research project is designed to examine why timber should be used for the future development of educational buildings in the UK. There is a need for new educational buildings in the UK as the demand on education is rising due to the increase in population. This research will investigate why timber should be used for the development of schools in the UK, outlining the sustainable benefits of the material, and the learning environment created. It is argued that timber is the most environmentally friendly building material, as it not only removes carbon from the atmosphere but stores it within the structure throughout its lifetime. If timber was chosen to regenerate the UK’s educational buildings, the country would ultimately be more sustainable.

    Two modern timber schools were visited to obtain the necessary data required. In addition to this an 'Online Software Survey and Questionnaire Tool' was used to acquire primary and secondary research. The two timber schools visited were the Open Academy located in Norwich and St Luke’s C.E Primary School located in Wolverhampton. These visits helped towards understanding how sustainable the construction process is during developing an educational timber structure as well as the level of learning environment created. The research also aimed to identify the availability for the United Kingdom’s construction industry, mainly looking at where the best resources can be found.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Technology > School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2011 13:50
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:48
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/5341

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