How has the concept of the New Lad served to promote and protect a new model of hegemonic masculinity within contemporary British society?

Humphreys, Kathryn (2008) How has the concept of the New Lad served to promote and protect a new model of hegemonic masculinity within contemporary British society? BA dissertation, University of Portsmouth.

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    Abstract

    The proposal of this study was to investigate how the creation of the figure, the New Lad by men's magazine Loaded sought to re-pitch hegemonic masculinity as a lifestyle through casting invisibility and oppression upon any visible threat. Throughout the men's magazine texts circulated within Britain today, there is a repetitive lifestyle exerted that is supposedly a reflection of a new contemporary standardized format of hegemonic masculinity. This New Lad has become a familiarized and popular figure, attracting both conformity and a high circulation of criticism and during this investigation I have unveiled who he is and most importantly who he is not. The discussion within this dissertation primarily focuses upon attempts by this hegemonic figure to defend and dissolve any possible overturn of his patriarchal subordinating powers. Through this idea, the study follows the objection of three oppressed groups. The first is the woman, the second is the homosexual and the third is the racial minority. The entire study looks at how each particular group has been perceived as a threat and the tactics in play that have attempted to keep them at bay. Accompanying this commentary is the specific avoidance by the New Lad of criticisms of his sexism, homophobia and racism that is hidden beneath an overpowering ironic narrative.

    Item Type: Dissertation
    Departments/Research Groups: Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries > School of Media and Performing Arts
    Depositing User: Jane Polwin
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2011 12:48
    Last Modified: 28 Jan 2015 11:14
    URI: http://eprints.port.ac.uk/id/eprint/527

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